THU 09 NOV – ‘The Graduate’ (PG) 50th Anniversary

50th Anniversary screening with Orkney Book Festival

Doors open 7:15 for a 7:45 start
£5 / £3 student and Young Scot card
x
West Side Cinema is teaming up once again with Orkney Book Festival (09-12 November).
x
Adapted from the 1963 novella by Charles Webb, the film is one of those rare adaptations that critics hailed as better than the book.

The music, the performances, the precision in capturing the post-college malaise — The Graduate’s coming-of-age story is indeed one for the ages.

“One word: plastics.” “Are you here for an affair?” These lines and others became cultural touchstones, as 1960s youth rebellion seeped into the California upper middle-class in Mike Nichols’ landmark hit. Directing his second feature film after Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Nichols matched the story’s satire of suffocating middle-class shallowness with an anti-Hollywood style influenced by the then-voguish French New Wave. Using odd angles, jittery editing, and evocative widescreen photography, Nichols welded a hip New Wave style and a generation-gap theme to a fairly traditional screwball comedy script by Buck Henry and Calder Willingham from Charles Webb’s novel.  With a pop-song score written by Paul Simon and performed by Simon & Garfunkel bolstering its contemporary appeal, The Graduate opened to rave reviews in December 1967 and surpassed all commercial expectations. It became the top-grossing film of 1968 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture, Actor, and Actress, with Nichols winning Best Director. Together with Bonnie and Clyde, it stands as one of the most influential films of the late ’60s, as its mordant dissection of the generation gap helped lead the way to the youth-oriented Hollywood artistic “renaissance” of the early ’70s.
x